Tag Archive

U.S. once had China-like air pollution

By Jack Williams ©2015

Stories about the choking air pollution in China prompted Jack to write a Washington Post Capital Weather Gang story on Oct. 25, 2013 about an episode of deadly pollution that sickened  and killed people in the small Pennsylvania manufacturing town of Donora in 1948. Jack first researched the Donora pollution disaster while writing Chapter 11 of the AMS Weather Book: The... »

Washington Science Academy honors Jack

By Jack Williams ©2015

The Washington Academy of Sciences presented Jack a "Special Award for the Public Understanding of Science" at a dinner on May 8, 2014 at the Sphinx Club in downtown Washington, D.C. The award notes Jack's  contributions as founding editor of the influential USA TODAY Weather Page" and as author or co-author of popular books on meteorology. Al Teich... »

Jack writes section of National Geographic book

By Jack Williams ©2015

Jack wrote the weather section--one  of five--in the National Geographic Illustrated Guide to Nature: From Your Back Door to the Great Outdoors, which came out in early 2014. The other sections are: Wildflowers, Trees & Shrubs, Rocks & Minerals, and Night Sky.The book is generally a field guide with brief descriptions of each phenomena, It has full-color photos for each one... »

Jack looks at hurricanes from several angles

By Jack Williams ©2015

Jack Williams believes you can't say too much about hurricanes---but don't try to say it all at the same time. Below are links to hurricane-related stories Jack has done for the Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang blog with the latest stories first. Hurricane hunting began in 1947 with Army Air Forces WB 25s flying into the Great Atlantic Hurricane. Hurricanes can be dangerous... »

National Geographic publishes Jack’s latest book

By Jack Williams ©2015

The National Geographic published Jack's  latest book, the Field Guide to the Water's Edge, on  May 1, 2012. Jack is co-author with Stephen Leatherman, who is widely known as Dr. Beach for his annual 10 Best Beaches lists. Stephen's day job is is the director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at Florida International University in Miami. He's been issuing his America's... »

Background on Lake Vostok

By Jack Williams ©2015

The material below is from Chapter 24 of the Complete Idiot's Guide to the Arctic and Antarctic ©by Jack Williams, 2003. It offers some background on the Feb. 7, 2012 announcement that the Russians had succeeded in drilling into Lake Vostok. The text has not been updated since it was originally written in 2003. Jack's commentary on Lake Vostok news... »

Commentary: Don’t let facts get in the way

By Jack Williams ©2015

Journalists like to joke that one shouldn't let the facts get in the way of a good story. Some journalists seem to take this joke  as a guide to spinning a good yarn. A yarn that in the old days would get the story on a newspaper's Page 1 and today will bring lots of hits and links to a Web... »

Using weather to teach science

By Jack Williams ©2015

Jack Williams was among the 10 men and women who offered teachers ideas for using meteorology  in the classroom at the 2011 National Weather Association Teachers' Workshop on Oct. 17 in Birmingham, Ala. Williams offered suggestions on how teachers could use graphics and text in his AMS Weather Book: The Ultimate Guide to America's Weather. He mentioned that the Book's... »

Answers: heating, cooling degree days

By Jack Williams ©2015

Q: Several years ago, you wrote a short article for USA TODAY about heating degree days. I have depended on that article, and its links, to monitor the heating and cooling degree days in my area.  Now, I cannot access this article any longer through a USA TODAY search and I'd really like to have access to it.  I would... »

Photos of the Shuttle Discovery launch

By Jack Williams ©2015

The photos in this gallery snow the first two minutes of the  Feb. 24, 2011 Space Shuttle Discovery launch. They were taken using a 300 mm lens from the media area at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., which is approximately three miles from the launch pad. Note that  from photo 6 to photo 9 in the gallery Discovery rolls so that the orbiter... »