Tag Archive

Answers: Rising and Sinking Air

By Jack Williams ©2015

Q: In your AOPA Flight Training Magazine, January 2010 article you say that the curving path of upper air winds cause air to sink in some areas, creating high pressure at the surface, and to rise in other areas creating or strengthening areas of low pressure at the surface.  My question: How does adding rising air to an area, which... »

Science Lessons from Ida

By Jack Williams ©2015

Ida,  a late-season hurricane that caused serious flooding along the U.S. Northeast Coast after it was no longer a hurricane or even a tropical storm offers teachers opportunities to hitch science lessons to a big news story. Even students who say they don't follow the news surely must have  heard of the storm if they live along the Gulf of Mexico... »

Answers: Storm Winds

By Jack Williams ©2015

Q: Why doesn't an extratropical cyclone continue to rotate around a 360-degree axis, like a hurricane?  I've always wondered why a cold front begins to the northwest of the low center and then dies out on the northeast side. Why doesn't it continue to just rotate?  How does the Coriolis effect play into all of this? Jeff, Pensacola, Florida A:  The answer... »

Answers: Extratropical Cyclone Winds

By Jack Williams ©2015

Q: My question is about your article in the November  AOPA Flight Training magazine on tropical cyclones.  I'm trying to reconcile two potentially different ideas: first, that a cyclone has swirling air (which I assume to mean the the air masses are rotating around the Low), and second, that the warm front and cold front are generally in the same... »